May 7, 2020

Live Online! Wednesday, May 13, Secret Science Club presents Astrophysicist Priya Natarajan, FREE on Zoom

Secret Science Club’s new online edition is about to blast off!

Join us live via Zoom on Wednesday, May 13, 8pm with astrophysicist Priya Natarajan. 

“Doors” to the Zoom Room will open at 7:30pm. 

Shhh... everyone on our mailing list will be emailed the Zoom link the night before.

In the meantime… 
--Put it on your calendar
--Get ready to mix your own cosmic cocktails & groove to interstellar tunes
--Prepare to take a deep dive into the nearest black hole, as we set off to explore our expanding Universe
--Bring your questions for the live Q&A!

Priyamvada Natarajan is a professor of astronomy and physics at Yale University, specializing in dark matter, dark energy, and supermassive black holes. The author of over 100 scientific papers, Dr. Natarajan and her work have been featured in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Scientific American, and New York Times, as well as on PBS’s NOVA, NPR, CNN, StarTalk, and the BBC. She is the author of the award-winning book Mapping the Heavens: The Radical Scientific Ideas that Reveal the Cosmos

This is a FREE event! 

Note: If you don’t already have the Zoom meeting app on your computer or mobile device, you can download it for free at zoom.us

To support Secret Science Club's online programming, you can make a donation via:

Credit Card, PayPal, Apple Pay, or Google Pay on Donorbox:

Cash App: $SecretScienceClub

Zelle: scienceliveproductions@gmail.com


This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

March 25, 2020

Secret Science Club's live in-person events are on hiatus as we all practice social distancing during the COVID-19 outbreak. 

Stay well... and stay tuned for updates as we work to bring our live science programming online! 

In the meantime, please "SSC and chill" at home with these recent videos. 

Check out our Dana Foundation Brain Lecture with Neuroscientist Nim Tottenham. She spoke at Secret Science Club about human brain development, emotional behavior, stress, and well-being.  


If you missed seeing Sean Carroll's talk about quantum physics and "Something Deeply Hidden" at our Secret Science Club North event last fall, you can see the entire talk (with an intro by physicist Brian Greene) on C-SPAN's BookTV.


At last December's SSC North event at Symphony Space, astronaut Kathryn Sullivan talked about her life in outer space and her book Handprints on Hubble: An Astronaut's Story of Invention. Watch it here

March 4, 2020

***POSTPONED*** Secret Science Club & the Dana Foundation present the Dana Foundation Brain Lecture with Neuroscientist Daphna Shohamy
(in honor of Brain Awareness Week!)
MONDAY, March 16, 8PM @ the Bell House, FREE

Folks, we are sorry to announce that our March 16 Secret Science Club event at the Bell House is being postponed due to the COVID-19 outbreak. The Dana Foundation Brain Lecture with Neuroscientist Daphna Shohamy will be rescheduled at a future date.

According to neuroscientist Daphna Shohamy, “memories are fundamental to everything we are and everything we do.” We use memories to learn. We use memories to make decisions. We use memories to form our identities. We use memories consciously, subconsciously, and constantly.

At the next Secret Science Club, Daphna Shohamy dives deep into the human brain to explore the links between memories, decision-making, and motivation. She asks:

--What exactly is memory? And how are memories built?
--What’s going on in the brain when we learn new things and form new habits?
--How do rewards and motivation shape how memories are formed?
--What role does dopamine play in memory and learning?
--How do different parts of the brain work together to use memories to make decisions?

BEFORE & AFTER
--Try our cocktail of the night, the “Memory Palace”
--Shimmy to mind-blowing tunes 
--Stick around for scintillating Q&A

Daphna Shohamy is a neuroscientist, professor of psychology, and director of the Learning Lab at Columbia University. She uses behavioral research and neuroimaging studies to explore the neural processes by which memory, learning, and decision-making interact. She is the recipient of the McKnight Foundation Memory and Cognitive Disorders Award, the Cognitive Neuroscience Society’s Young Investigator Award, and the Association for Psychological Science Janet Spence Award. Her research has been featured in Psychology Today, Vulture, The Verge, Time, and Popular Science, and she served as a scientific advisor to the Oscar-winning animated film Inside Out.

This edition of Secret Science Club—the Brain Awareness Week kickoff lecture featuring Daphna Shohamy—is sponsored by the Dana Foundation. The Dana Foundation is dedicated to advancing understanding about the brain in health and disease through research grants and public outreach.

Brain Awareness Week is the global campaign to foster public enthusiasm and support for brain science. Every March, partners host imaginative activities in their communities that share the wonders of the brain and the impact brain science has on our everyday lives. Search the calendar of events for fun and fascinating events throughout New York City!

Secret Science Club meets Monday, March 16, 8 pm @ the Bell House, 149 7th St. (between 2nd and 3rd avenues) in Gowanus, Brooklyn. Subway: F or G to 4th Ave, R to 9th St.

Doors open at 7:30 pm. Please bring ID: 21+. No cover. Just bring your smart self.

Photo credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

February 5, 2020

Welcome to the Invisible Universe! Secret Science Club presents Astrophysicist Chiara Mingarelli, Tuesday February 18, 8PM @ the Bell House, FREE!

Gravitational waves in space-time are like ripples in a pond cause by a pebble thrown in the water—that is, if the pebble’s impact had the energy of, say, our own Sun exploding. Predicted by Einstein in 1916, gravitational waves proved devilishly difficult to detect. It was only in 2015 that scientists were first able to pinpoint the existence of a real-life gravitational wave, echoing across space-time as the result of a collision of two black holes more than a billion miles away.

That discovery ushered in a new “wave” in astronomy: Gravitational waves aren’t just fascinating phenomena—they are a whole new way to study the cosmos. Astrophysicist Chiara Mingarelli is part of a consortium of international scientists, working on new methods to predict and detect gravitational waves in an effort to understand the large portion of the Universe that remains invisible to us.

At the next Secret Science Club, Dr. Mingarelli asks:
--Are there different kinds gravitational waves? Why are some harder to detect than others?
--What might gravitational waves teach us about dark matter, dark energy, black holes, and the Big Bang?
--What role do pulsars (those super-freaky but super-reliable, rotating, radio-wave emitting neutron stars) play in gravitational wave research?

Before & After
--Pulse and flow to grooooovitational tunes
--Contemplate the Universe with Dark Energy, our cocktail of the night
--Stick around for the stellar Q&A

Chiara Mingarelli is an astrophysicist at the Flatiron Institute’s Center for Computational Astrophysics and an assistant professor of physics at the University of Connecticut. Her core research is focused on using Pulsar Timing Arrays to detect low-frequency gravitational waves. She is a member of NANOGrav (the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves), a consortium of scientists, using an international network of radio telescopes to detect gravitational waves caused by the merger of supermassive black holes. She has written for Scientific American and been a featured scientist on Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls, Quartz News, and the Science Channel’s How the Universe Works.

This astronomical edition of Secret Science Club meets Tuesday, February 18, 8 pm @ the Bell House, 149 7th St. (between 2nd and 3rd avenues) in Gowanus, Brooklyn. Subway: F or G to 4th Ave; R to 9th St.

Doors open at 7:30 pm. Please bring ID: 21+. No cover. Just bring your smart self!

Image credits: Chiara Mingarelli: Flatiron Institute; Gravitational Waves: NASA/C. Henze

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

January 12, 2020

Dive Inside the Human Body! Secret Science Club presents Structural Biologist Kevin Gardner, TUESDAY, January 21, 8PM @ the Bell House, FREE!

The human body is made of trillions of cells. Inside each cell, it’s as busy as the subway system with a dismaying array of routes, signals, and ever-moving parts. Exploring these teeny-tiny living labyrinths is the mission of modern-day micronauts like Kevin Gardner.

A biochemist and biophysicist, Kevin Gardner has been unlocking the secrets inside cells for over two decades. As he dives into this microscopic world, he visualizes how all-important cellular proteins look in three dimensions and studies how they react to different stimuli—all with the goal of learning how the human body works and finding new cures for diseases.

At the next Secret Science Club, Dr. Gardner asks:
--How do cells—bacteria, plant, and human—sense what is going on in the world around them?
--What role does light play in the world of cells? What are “optogenetic tools”? How do they turn genes on and off?
--How can understanding a cell’s reaction to stimuli, such as light and oxygen levels, be used to discover new biotech tools and cancer treatments?

BEFORE & AFTER
--Imbibe our macroscopic cocktail of the night, the Inner Space
--Sway to bio-themed tunes and feel the grooves at the cellular level
--Stick around for the scintillating Q&A

Kevin Gardner is the Einstein Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry at the City College of New York, and he is the Director of the Structural Biology Initiative at CUNY’s Advanced Science Research Center. Dr. Gardner uses combinations of structural biology methods, including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, to probe how cellular proteins perceive and react to changes in the environments around them. He and his research team have discovered that a diverse group of proteins use similar mechanisms of signaling and regulation despite sensing radically different stimuli. His lab is exploring how these processes can be artificially controlled, leading to the development of new anti-cancer therapies and research tools.

This molecular edition of the Secret Science Club meets Tuesday, January 21, 8 pm @ the Bell House, 149 7th St. (between 2nd and 3rd avenues) in Gowanus, Brooklyn. Subway: F or G to 4th Ave, R to 9th St.

Doors open at 7:30 pm. Please bring ID: 21+. No cover. Just bring your smart self.

For more information, contact secretscienceclub@gmail.com Or visit us on the Web at http://secretscienceclub.blogspot.com 

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.